Please complete this form in order to receive your non-BAP hours. Our faculty adviser will review the hours and contact you as soon as possible. Thank you.

Please note that:
1.You may report a maximum of 5 hours per year of professional activities and a maximum of 5 hours per year of service activities that are not sponsored by Beta Alpha Psi.
2. In the candidate quarter, you may report a maximum of 2 hour of professional activities and a maximum of 2 hours of service activities that are not sponsored by Beta Alpha Psi.

Beta Alpha Psi Sponsored Activities
Non Beta Alpha Psi Sponsored Events
Actual (Substantive) versus Administrative Time
Professional Activities
Service Activities

Beta Alpha Psi Sponsored Activities

These activities are either "(1) organized and carried out by the ... chapter or (2) ...involve participation by the members of the beta Alpha Psi chapter as a group (in which case the chapter has agreed to participate as a chapter and has announced the event at several meetings and promoted participation in the event.)"

Chapter officials will take attendance at every event it sponsors e.g. weekly professional meetings and periodic service events. Attendance is also recorded by Beta Alpha Psi officials at national and regional events. Since others are keeping track of the time involved, members and pledges should NOT report such activity.

Non Beta Alpha Psi Sponsored Events

Activities that fall outside the above definition are non-BAP. In general, these activities are organized/planned/conducted by other organizations or ones that do not involve the chapter as a whole. They are activities that one or a few BAP members or pledges elect to attend on their own. Since "chapters must retain detailed information regarding nonBAP activity including 1) the member/pledge involved in the activity, 2) the number of hours of participation and 3) a description of the activity," these events are the focus of this reporting system

If you have questions about any aspect of these instructions first contact the VP of Membership.

Actual (Substantive) versus Administrative Time

Suppose you attended a nonBAP sponsored professional meeting where the following occurred:

5:30-5:40 Introduction, administrative announcements, etc.
5:40-6:25 Presentation by a professional on some topic
6:25-6:30 Closing remarks, thank you’s, etc.

On the surface, it would appear that 60 minutes of your time was devoted to this event and should therefore be reported. But if you reported 60 minutes, you would be overstating the time devoted to enhancing your preparation for a career by 15 minutes (only the 45-minute presentation did that.)

The national office wants to ensure only actual (substantive time is credited to each member, pledge and the chapter. Their reporting guidelines recognize that in practically all types of activities there will be some administrative versus substantive activities. To implement that belief, their reporting system is designed to capture the actual time by 1) talking the lapse time (60 minutes in the above example) and 2) reducing it by 1/6th, i.e, only 5/6th of the time (50 minutes) should actually be reported. In other words, for the national system to work, you must tell the reporter that actual (substantive) time was or was not kept. In the above example, if you did not tell the reporter that actual (substantive) time was kept, your 60 minutes would be reduced to 50 minutes and such would be reported. But following that guidance still overstates the actual (substantive) time of your efforts by five minutes.

In the belief that the goal is to report time as accurately as possible, this chapter asks that every time a nonBAP activity (professional or service) is reported, that the total lapse time be split between administrative and actual (substantive) time. In the above example, the 60 minutes should be broken down into 15 minutes administrative and 45 minutes actual (substantive) time.

Ideally you will keep track of the administrative and actual (substantive) time at each nonBAP activity you attend. But if you did not, we ask that you estimate both components in the belief that even an estimate will produce more accurate information than blindly applying a 1/6th reduction to all such time.

Note that the above instructions apply equally to service events.

Professional Activities

Professional events contribute to the professional development of the member/pledge. Reportable time includes not only the presentation itself but also time spent on questions to and answers from the professional presenters. If an event brings the student into direct or indirect contact with a professional, it is probably professional and thus reportable. Also, while the technical focus of such events generally should center on or directly relate to finance, accounting or information system topics, other topics may indirectly apply. For example, marketing and etiquette are related to finance, accounting, or information systems fields. Preparing for case competitions is not a professional activity but the time spent presenting that case to the professional does count (the amount of time devoted to the presentation only should be doubled). Meeting with a mentor or listening to a presentation counts. If you are still unsure as to what constitutes a professional activity, see BAP’s national web site

Service Activities

Service activities are more difficult to define, primarily because they are often confused with “volunteering.”If one “volunteers” to do some unethical deed such as rob a bank, a “service” has not been performed. Service does involve volunteering “one's time, energy and/or talents” but the end result should be to better either the campus or local community or a component thereof. Service involves producing a positive impact on those persons, groups or entities in need. If some disadvantaged element benefits from your efforts and your motivation was to provide that benefit, then the event is probably reportable as a service event.

Service may be either direct or indirect. One is directly involved when providing the primary benefit such as tutoring the student, building a Habitat for Humanity house, working one-on-one with children at the Boys and Girls club, or preparing and serving food at the soup kitchen. One is indirectly involved when time is freely given in a support role such as delivering materials to the building site, raising funds intended for a charitable purpose, or performing other "back office" functions such as accounting or computer systems that are 1) essential to the success of the event and 2) are normally performed by volunteers.

Activities that do not constitute community service include assisting friends or family (e.g. helping a friend move, serving as a teacher’s aide and performing only administrative tasks, teaching Sunday school) “or volunteering to participate in events where the underlying purpose is recruitment.” If you are still unsure as to what constitutes a service activity, see BAP’s national web site

* indicates required field


*Total Time- Admin Time = Reportable Time